Cathy Breen of Falmouth (Finally) Wins Long-Contested Senate District 25 Race

Posted on December 18, 2014. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Was the dispute less about the Senate and more about back room shenanigans?

Chair Senator Roger Katz (R-Kennebec) asks Deputy Secretary of State Julie Flynn a question during Tuesday's hearing. Also pictured (L-R) Senators Stan Gerzofsky, Garrett Mason, Bill Diamond, Dawn Hill, Andre Cushing and Tom Saviello.

Chair Senator Roger Katz (R-Kennebec) asks Deputy Secretary of State Julie Flynn a question during Tuesday’s hearing. Also pictured (L-R) Senators Stan Gerzofsky, Garrett Mason, Bill Diamond, Dawn Hill, Andre Cushing and Tom Saviello.

Maine got a preview of what to expect in 2015 thanks to the now-resolved “Who won Senate District 25?” question last week. For a month, Mainers had speculated as to what occurred. It seemed impossible that 12% more ballots than actual participating voters materialized out of thin air; something funky had to have happened. But what? No one knew for sure, but everyone had an opinion.

A petition calling for officials to “investigate potential voter fraud” garnered 3200 signatures. Representative Janice Cooper (D-Yarmouth) took a sterner approach:

    “One of two things has to happen to put this matter to rest: the state attorney general or the U.S. Attorney should immediately conduct a thorough, independent criminal investigation of the circumstances of this discrepancy, one that involves questioning all relevant witnesses under oath and forensic experts.”

Senate President Mike Thibodeau went against Secretary of State Matt Dunlap’s recommendations by provisionally seating Manchester:

    “The fact of the matter is that we have had a recount and the results of that recount left Cathy Manchester as the apparent winner. Because some folks are not happy with that outcome, they’re throwing around some pretty wild accusations.”

Why the rush? Simply put, Republicans needed her vote later that same day on the Constitutional officers, as they were within one vote of replacing Attorney General Janet T. Mills. Seating Manchester gave one more vote to their surprise candidate, Bill Logan, the GOP recount attorney.

Got that? Manchester was quickly shoved into office so she could vote for her own lawyer. Not that there is anything wrong with that.

Thibodeau eventually named a seven member Investigative Committee. Spoiler alert: Democrat Cathy Breen’s originally reported 32 vote lead held.

Tuesday’s public hearing was held in the packed Legislative Council chamber with only live audio feed available for those not in the room.

Deputy Secretary of State Julie Flynn was the first witness. Sworn in before a room full of media, lawyers, candidates and election officials, armed with a 4″ binder full of documentation and 25 years of recount experience, she confidently gave detailed testimony for hours. Frankly, it was pretty dry stuff and with 30 people scheduled to speak after her, a quick resolution seemed unlikely.

To break it down, imagine the 171 ballots as a deck of cards, but divided into 3 piles of 50 with a leftover stack of 21. Take each stack individually and divide into 3 smaller groups: Breen, Manchester and Other (No Votes). Write down the results from that first group, rinse and repeat for the rest of the stacks, then add them up. Long Island officials tallied 95 Breen, 65 Manchester and 11 Other equaling 171 votes cast, but the Augusta recount team came up with 21 more for Manchester, totaling 192. The ballots had been bundled with tally sheets designated as “A1, A2, A3 and A4″.

One 50 ballot lot had a total of 21 votes for Manchester, catching the eye of former Secretary of State Senator Bill Diamond (D-Windham). He remarked to Flynn, “On A3… it just jumped out at me, because Manchester had 21 votes … is there any way… that number could be, could have been… is there anything unusual about that number?”

Flynn had no answer and appeared momentarily flustered. She did not answer and continued to discuss the next lot.

The committee decided next to examine the ballots and it was quickly surmised that Diamond’s instincts had been spot-on, as the first lot had only 29 ballots instead of 50. A second recount immediately confirmed the 21 A3 ballots had been added in twice.

Manchester addressed the senators to announce her intention to offer a formal letter of resignation to President Thibodeau and congratulated Senator-elect Breen on her win.

The governor issued a statement, “I thank Senate President Thibodeau for his integrity throughout this process, in which liberals falsely accused Republicans of trying to manipulate the election with so-called ‘phantom ballots’. President Thibodeau followed the proper procedure to ensure the electoral process was upheld while awaiting the final decision from the Senate committee. It is unfortunate that Cathy Manchester had to endure a situation that was created entirely by the Secretary of State’s office during the recount.”

As for Thibodeau, his only response was, “You can’t read my word balloon, man.”

The Senate will meet in January and will have to vote to seat Breen.

—–

(Published in the 12/18/14 edition of DigPortland)

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UPDATED: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Recount*

Posted on December 1, 2014. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

UPDATE: Despite the fact that the panel of seven senators that will be tasked with resolving the SD 25 election has not even yet been selected and named, let alone met to take up the messy problem, the Maine State Senate webpage has been amended to give the win to the Republican candidate, Cathy Manchester:

    About the 127th Maine State Senate

    All members of the 127th Maine Senate have been elected to serve a two-year term. Of the 35 members, there are 21 Republicans and 14 Democrats. Eight are women (4 Republicans and 4 Democrats) and 27 are men (17 Republicans and 10 Democrats).

The link to NEW Contact Information for Members of the 127th Maine Senate (excel spreadsheet) continues to have Democrat Cathy Breen as the winner.

A pair of press conferences were held on Monday with each side repeating their stance as to whether what occurred was a mistake or something more deliberate:

    “It appears that there was just a clerical error that 21 ballots didn’t get counted. And we’re glad they’ve been counted. But we want to find out for sure,” said Senator Roger Katz, R-Augusta.

    “We expect Republicans to share this concern of potential ballot tampering because, again, this is not about a political party, it is about the integrity and confidence we can all have when we cast our ballot,” said outgoing Senate President Justin Alfond D-Portland.

———-

Senator Elect Nate Libby of Lewiston is congratulated by Secretary of State Matt Dunlap.

Senator District 21 Elect Nate Libby of Lewiston is congratulated by Secretary of State Matt Dunlap.


Before Thanksgiving, the Secretary of State’s office was tasked with settling a handful of disputed elections, as happens periodically. At one point, WCSH and MPBN reported there would be recounts in Senate District 2 (Aroostook County) and 13 (Lincoln County). But later it was confirmed that the requests for both had been withdrawn.

That left three races for resolution in Senate Districts 11, 21 and 25. These recounts were a result of either being automatically generated due to the closeness of the initial tallies or per request of a candidate. Preliminary totals via BDN:


    Senate District 11 (Waldo County), Democrat Jonathan Fulford versus Mike Thibodeau. According to unofficial election results compiled by the Bangor Daily News (the Secretary of State’s office has not yet posted its results), the incumbent Thibodeau won the seat 9,064 votes to 8,949, a 115-vote margin. Thibodeau, the former Senate minority leader, was nominated by his Republican peers Friday to be president of the Senate for the 127th Legislature, though that is subject to approval by the full Senate when it convenes in December.

    Senate District 21 (Lewiston), Democrat Nathan Libby versus Republican Patricia Gagne. According to the BDN’s unofficial results, Libby was victorious by a vote of 6,636 to 6,572, a 64-vote margin. This seat was formerly held by Democrat Margaret Craven, who opted not to seek re-election.

    Senate District 25 (part of Cumberland County), Democrat Catherine Breen versus Republican Cathleen Manchester. According to the BDN’s unofficial results, Breen took the seat by a vote of 10,897 to 10,890, a seven-vote margin. This seat was previously held by independent Richard Woodbury, who opted not to seek re-election.

The manual examinations included recounting all ballots separately for each municipality within the district, searching for any potentially overlooked ballots accidentally tucked into stacks of absentee envelopes, ensuring that the overseas ballots from other areas of the state were either not accidentally included or that overseas ballots were not accidentally omitted and investigation of all rejected ballots.

The process of recounting the ballots is methodical, meticulous, slow and tedious work, carried out by Deputy Secretary of State Julie Flynn and her staff in the Florian Room of the Maine Public Safety Building in Augusta. The entire proceedings, open to the public, included teams made of an official from the Secretary of State’s office working with both a registered Democratic and Republican volunteer. There were attorneys for both parties available throughout the recounts to weigh in on disputed ballots, irregularities and the like, as well as other support staff tabulating the final tallies before the final certification for each race.

Results were made public by Secretary of State Matt Dunlap in press releases and on Facebook.

Senate District 25 recount began at 9am.

Senate District 25 recount began at 9am on November 18.

    (Friday, Nov. 14) Senate District 11: “In the State Senate District 11 recount, results show that Republican Michael Thibodeau is the winner. Jonathan Fulford (D) received 8,974 votes, while Thibodeau received 9,109 in the recount.”

    (Monday, Nov. 17) Senate District 21: “The State Senate District 21 (City of Lewiston) recount is now complete. Results show that Democrat Nathan Libby remains the winner, with 6,646 votes to Republican Patricia Gagne’s 6,563.”

    (Tuesday, Nov. 18) Senate District 25:

And here’s where “a funny thing happened”.

By 5 pm on the 18th, not only was there no clear winner after all of the present ballots were re-examined, but it was told to this reporter that a box of ballots had been discovered to still be in Westbrook and being brought to Augusta by Maine State Police- an unusual turn of events that meant a further delay of SD 25’s final results.

Maine Secretary of State Matt Dunlap

Maine Secretary of State Matt Dunlap

Even funnier- later on that evening, Secretary of State’s office issued the following statement:

    The State Senate District 25 final results will be decided by the Senate. The recount showed a reversal in the apparent winner, with Catherine Breen (D) getting 10,916 votes and Cathleen Manchester (R) getting 10,927, but the results were not accepted by both candidates.

    When the Legislature convenes in January, its standing Senatorial Vote Committee will review the situation and make a recommendation to the full Senate on which candidate should be seated for the full term. (The committee is made up of four majority and three minority members.) The Senate will then make the final determination of which candidate to seat, typically no later than January.”

Soon it was learned that at the center of the dispute were not ballots from Westbrook, but rather almost 2 dozen new GOP ballots from Long Island. Immediately calls for a full investigation into potential voter fraud began:

    Unanswered questions remain about 21 ballots from the town of Long Island that can’t seem to be attributed to any voter. The ballots were discovered on Nov. 18, the night of the recount, and all of them contained a vote for Republican Cathleen Manchester of Gray, who had requested the recount.

    During an election, wardens at each polling place keep track of which registered voters have cast ballots. This ensures that no one gets to vote twice. The incoming voter list, or “voter manifest,” in Long Island indicated that 171 residents cast ballots either in person or absentee in this year’s election.

    Attorneys Katherine Knox (D) and Bill Logan (R) examine a disputed ballot.

    Attorneys Katherine Knox (D) and Bill Logan (R) examine a disputed ballot.

    That’s the same number of votes presented by warden and Town Clerk Brenda Singo in unofficial results relayed on election night to the Bangor Daily News and the Associated Press. Long Island, a town of about 230 residents, has only one polling place, and Singo was the only warden.

    However, when the locked box of ballots was opened during the recount, 192 ballots were found. Put simply, there are 21 more ballots from Long Island than there are documented voters.

Incoming Senate President elect Mike Thibodeau, who himself had been subject to a recount, had this to say:

    “I think the committee could convene and go over the results on swearing-in day. We’ve got to figure out if Cathy Manchester has the most votes. It’s unfortunate to throw around terms like that without some sort of substantial evidence. The fact of the matter is that we have had a recount and the results of that recount left Cathy Manchester as the apparent winner. Because some folks are not happy with that outcome, they’re throwing around some pretty wild accusations.”

Rep. Janice Cooper (D-Yarmouth) represents House District 47, which consists of Yarmouth, Long Island and Chebeague Island, has called for Attorney General Janet Mills to look into the matter.

    “One of two things has to happen to put this matter to rest: the state attorney general or the U.S. Attorney should immediately conduct a thorough, independent criminal investigation of the circumstances of this discrepancy, one that involves questioning all relevant witnesses under oath and forensic experts.

    Senate Asst Majority Leader Andre Cushing, President Mike Thibodeau and Majority Leader Garret Mason

    Senate Asst Majority Leader Andre Cushing, President Mike Thibodeau and Majority Leader Garret Mason

    Our state Constitution provides that it’s up to the Senate to decide the qualifications of its members. However, that does not absolve state or federal prosecutors from doing their job. The Senate president-elect says he will appoint a special committee to look into the matter. However, whether or how independently that investigation is conducted is up to them. Because a majority of the committee will be members of the same party as the recount winner, the outcome is bound to be suspect as politically biased unless the investigation is truly impartial and thorough.

    It’s entirely appropriate for a political body to make political decisions, as we do on proposed legislation or nominations. Sometimes, however, the Legislature must act in a quasi-judicial role, which is not easy.

    Years ago, I was counsel to the U.S. House Judiciary Committee in an impeachment case concerning removal of a federal judge for alleged conspiracy to commit bribery. The case came to the House with a massive record from a criminal trial, grand jury and independent counsel’s investigation. Nevertheless, the House also conducted its own investigation, subpoenaing and deposing witnesses under oath, conducting forensic investigations, etc. We then presented our case first to the House of Representatives and then to the U.S. Senate. For the most part, the proceedings followed judicial rules of evidence. The judge was impeached, convicted and removed from office.

    This is what a quasi-judicial legislative inquiry should look like. Whether the Maine Senate is prepared to go to this length remains to be seen. Frankly, they don’t have the resources or the expertise, even if they had the will.

    That’s why we should leave it to professional prosecutors to conduct the inquiry. The Senate can seat whom it wants, but whether that decision stands or is set aside by the courts would very likely hinge on the outcome of a professional inquiry. Nothing less will do.

*Apologies to Stephen Sondheim et al

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Incoming 127th Maine Legislature Picks Leaders (UPDATED w/ Statements)

Posted on November 13, 2014. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Senate President Mike Thibodeau, Majority Leader Garrett Mason and Asst Majority Leader Andre Cushing

Senate President Mike Thibodeau (Waldo), Majority Leader Garrett Mason (Androscoggin) and Asst Majority Leader Andre Cushing (Penobscot)

Last week, the Republicans in both legislative chambers of the Maine State House selected their leadership.

With Friday’s recount of Senate District 11 between Sen. Mike Thibodeau of Waldo and challenger Jonathan Fulford of Monroe concluding that the district re-elected the incumbent by a 135 vote margin, the make-up of the Senate Majority leadership team selected last week will be: Senate President Mike Thibodeau, Majority Leader Garrett Mason and Assistant Majority Leader Andre Cushing. Each issued statements:

Senate President Mike Thibodeau:“I cannot begin to express what this means to me. It is a true honor to be chosen by such an outstanding group of people to lead not only them, but the entire Maine Senate.

“At the same time, I recognize it is an awesome responsibility. The people of Maine spoke very clearly in this week’s election. They are demanding action on critical issues such as job creation, energy costs, and welfare reform. We cannot let them down. Delivering real results will take the efforts of both Republicans and Democrats to put their partisan differences aside and work in a collaborative manner on behalf of the people of Maine. It is what we were elected to do and we must rise to the challenge.”

Majority Leader Garrett Mason: “I am very honored to have earned the trust of my Republican colleagues who chose me to be the majority leader. I look forward to working with my fellow senators, members of the House of Representatives, and Governor LePage to find real solutions for the people of Maine.”

Assistant Majority Leader Andre Cushing: “I am looking forward to the opportunity to go to work on the agenda items that are most important to the citizens of Maine.”

As has been noted in the past, both Thibodeau and Cushing have long-standing ties to ALEC, as do a number of other returning Maine GOP senators and incoming Kim Rosen, wife of former State Senator Richard Rosen of Bucksport.

Over in the House, Republicans chose to retain 126th Minority Leader Ken Fredette of Newport to serve again in the 127th in that office and replace outgoing Alex Willette, who resigned to take a position with the LePage re-election campaign, with Rep. Eleanor Espling of New Gloucester.

Speaker of the House Mark Eves, , Majority Leader Jeff McCabe and Asst Majority Leader Sara Gideon

Speaker of the House Mark Eves (N. Berwick), Majority Leader Jeff McCabe (Skowhegan) and Asst Majority Leader Sara Gideon (Freeport)

On Wednesday, Democrats held separate caucuses to select their leaders. The House Democrats had lost a few seats in the recently concluded elections, but managed to retain their majority.

While Speaker of the House Mark Eves was not challenged for his seat, the other two leadership positions went up to votes by the caucus, with Rep. Barry Hobbins going up against Assistant Majority Leader Jeff McCabe for the Majority Leader spot last held by termed-out Rep. Seth Berry (Bowdoinham), and 126th freshmen Rep. Lori Lister Fowle (Vassalboro) taking on Rep. Sara Gideon (Freeport) for McCabe’s chair. Ultimately the body selected McCabe and Gideon to join Eves as their 127th Legislative leaders.

Speaker of the House Mark Eves: “It is an honor and privilege to lead our strong and historic 83 seat majority. With Election Day behind us, now is the time govern. We must come together with Governor LePage and our Republican colleagues to address the challenges we face as a state. We cannot allow the partisan battles of the past dictate our future.

“Too much is at stake for leaders to put their party ideology ahead of common sense solutions. Democrats and Republicans can see eye to eye on smart and strategic investments in our state, on property tax relief, on lowering energy costs and helping seniors and veterans. We must focus on areas of common ground, not conflict.”

Majority Leader Jeff McCabe: “We need to move Maine forward and do everything we can to improve the lives of Mainers. We must establish an economic message and policy that works statewide. The voters sent us a message on Election Day. They don’t care about party labels or partisan ideology. They care about government that works.”

Asst Majority Leader Sara Gideon: “Now that these long and divisive campaigns are over, it’s time to show the people of Maine that we are about action, that Democrats will deliver while holding steadfast to our values, that Democrats own the idea of prosperity for everyone. We will work with all our strength to protect the values of Maine people: women’s economic security and basic rights, workers’ ability to organize, a clean and sustainable environment and the integrity of excellent public school systems.”

The Senate-elect Democrats, who saw their 18 majority shrink to a 15 seat minority last week, held a caucus Wednesday evening in Hallowell.

Democratic Senators congratulate Dawn Hill as being selected as Assistant Minority Leader. To her right is Senator Justin Alfond, who will be moving from the podium as exiting Senate President to serve as Minority Leader for the upcoming 127th legislative session.

Democratic Senators congratulate Dawn Hill as being selected as Assistant Minority Leader. To her right is Senator Justin Alfond, who will be moving from the podium as exiting Senate President to serve as Minority Leader for the upcoming 127th legislative session.

They chose outgoing Senate President Justin Alfond of Portland to serve as their Minority Leader in the upcoming 127th legislative session. Alfond is in his final term and served in the 125th Legislature as Assistant Minority Leader to then-Senator Barry Hobbins’ Minority Leader.

Senator Dawn Hill of Cape Neddick, who chaired the 126th Legislature’s Appropriations and Financial Affairs Committee and was honored as Emerge Maine’s Woman of the Year along with fellow AFA Chair Rep. Peggy Rotundo of Lewiston, was chosen to serve as Assistant Minority Leader for the next two years.

Minority Leader Senator Justin Alfond:“Even though, as Democrats, our political beliefs may be different from Paul LePage and Republicans in the Legislature, there are areas in which we agree–and we must build off of that common ground in order to serve the Maine people. I will extend my hand with to Governor LePage, Senate President-elect Thibodeau and others to find that common ground and forge the relationships needed to move ideas forward that work for Maine people.”

Asst Minority Leader Dawn Hill: (sent a message of listening to her fellow lawmakers to ensure that) “we all carry the distinct stories and values of our districts. Listening is how we define our plan and our purpose going forward.”

The 127th Legislature will be sworn into office on December 3 by Governor Paul LePage.

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Incumbent State Senator John Tuttle Declared Winner of Senate District 33 (York Co) Democratic Primary in Recount, 843-822

Posted on June 19, 2014. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , |

In the second of two election recounts requested post- June 10th primary (Ralph Tucker was announced as the winner of House District 50 yesterday), incumbent State Senator John L. Tuttle led challenger Representative Andrea M. Boland by a margin of 841 votes to 821 votes in the Senate District 33 Democratic primary. SD 33 formerly SD 3, was redistricted and now contains the towns of Cornish, Parsonfield, Limerick, Newfield, Waterboro, Shapleigh and Sanford. Sanford, which previously included seven wards, is now divided up into three precincts.

DSC_0006After re-examination of the ballots, Tuttle picked up 2 votes to Boland’s 1 additional vote and was declared the winner, 843-822. He will go on to face political newcomer Republican Adam McGee of Sanford in the November general election.

Each released statements immediately after the tallies were certified:

    “I want to thank Representative Boland for running a great campaign and making me a better candidate,” said Senator Tuttle. “This election will be about who will be the best voice for working families in York County. I look forward to continuing to meet with and listen to voters in every community in this district.”

    Representative Andrea Boland (D-Sanford), who was the second-place finisher, thanked her supporters.

    “I congratulate Senator Tuttle for winning the primary,” Representative Boland said.

Some background information regarding recounts in Maine provided by Secretary of State Matt Dunlap’s office recently reads:

    “Maine law requires that a recount must be requested before any ballot boxes can be retrieved or other procedures for a recount are initiated. There is no threshold for an automatic recount in Maine law.

    Following the request for a recount, the Secretary of State works with the Maine State Police to retrieve the sealed ballot boxes and other election material from the municipal election officials of the affected precincts, and they are secured at the Maine State Police headquarters in Augusta. Candidates provide counting teams who are supervised by the Secretary of State, and candidates can have legal representation to help resolve issues around disputed ballots. Once the recount is complete, the candidates can agree to the result or, if the result remains in dispute, they would then appeal to the Maine Supreme Judicial Court for a resolution. In the general election, legislative disputes would be resolved by the Legislature.

    Under Maine law, candidates who appear to have lost an election can request a recount in writing within five business days of the election. If the margin of defeat is less than 2%, then the candidate can request the recount free of charge. If the margin of defeat is greater than 2%, the law requires the candidate to pay a deposit that is refunded if the apparent result from Election Day is overturned. If the margin of defeat is greater than 2% but less than 4%, the deposit required is $500. If the margin is greater than 4% but less than 6%, the deposit is $1,000; the maximum deposit for a recount is $10,000 for margins of defeat to be recounted of 10% or greater.”

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(UPDATED) Final List of Maine State House 126th Legislature with Full Updated Recount Details

Posted on November 21, 2012. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , |

More ballots arriving for recounts via Maine State Police transport.

While the majority of the 2012 election results were known quickly, almost a dozen legislative races were close enough to generate manual recounts. These recounts were a result of either being automatically generated due to the closeness of the initial tallies or per request of a candidate.

The manual examinations included recounting all ballots separately for each municipality within the district, searching for any potentially overlooked ballots accidentally tucked into stacks of absentee envelopes, ensuring that the overseas ballots from other areas of the state were either not accidentally included or that overseas ballots were not accidentally omitted and investigation of all rejected ballots.

The process was methodical, meticulous, slow and tedious, yet professionally and expertly handled by Deputy Secretary of State Julie Flynn and her staff over the course of the past 2 weeks at the Maine Public Safety Building in Augusta.

The entire proceedings, open to the public, included teams made of an official from the Secretary of State’s office working with both a registered Democratic and Republican volunteer. There were attorneys for both parties available throughout the recounts as well as other support staff tabulating the final tallies before the final certification, which included signatures from the candidates in addition to the political party’s attorneys and officials from the Secretary of State’s office.

Here is the full breakdown of the recounts:

Wednesday, November 14

HD 80’s Rep. Mel Newendyke (R-Litchfield) is congratulated by Democratic challenger Rachel Sukeforth

8:30 am HD 80- Sukeforth (D)/ incumbent Newendyke (R). Newendyke up 5.
(Incumbent GOP Rep. Mel Newendyke (Litchfield) was able to hold on to a 3 vote lead to win re-election)

1 pm HD 127- Aronson (D)/ incumbent Volk (R). Volk up 5.
(Rep. Amy Volk of Scarborough won her re-election bid with a 12 vote margin)

5:30 pm HD 94- incumbent Hayes (D)/ Turner (R). Hayes up 34.
(Rep. Terry Hayes, the Assistant Minority Leader of the 125th Legislature, added to her lead and clinched her win by a 58 vote advantage)

GOP Rep Bruce Bickford and Democratic challenger wait together for the results of the closest recount, HD 70.

Thursday, November 15

8:30 am HD 70- Werts (D)/ incumbent Bickford (R). Werts up 2.
(Auburn’s Wayne Werts’ lead doubled to 4, as he was proclaimed the winner over Rep. Bruce Bickford in the tightest of the recounts)

1 pm HD 144- Noon (D)/ Archambault (R). Noon up 19.
(William Noon added to his lead and won by 23 votes. This was an open seat, previously held by Republican Rep. Joan Nass of Acton)

5:30 pm HD 109- incumbent Graham (D)/ Austin (R). Graham up 42.
(Rep. Anne Graham won her recount with a final tally of 34 votes)

Friday, November 17

SD 17 Democratic challenger Colleen Quint observes the recounts for her race.

8:30 SD 17- Quint(D)/ incumbent Mason (R). Mason up 50.
(Incumbent GOP Rep. Garrett Mason lost ground in the recount process, but ultimately won by a 28 vote margin)

Monday, November 19

Deputy Secretary of State and recount lead official Julie Flynn congratulates Representative-elect Brian Jones of Freedom on his HD 45 win. Also pictured: Democratic lawyer Katherine Knox and House Democratic coordinated campaign staffer Brendan Mayhieu

8:30 am HD 45- Jones (D)/ incumbent Harmon (R). Jones up 33.
(GOP Rep. Ryan Harmon was upset by Democratic challenger Brian Jones of Freedom by a final margin of 31 votes)

1 pm HD 137- incumbent Casavant (D)/ Guay (R). Casavant up 15.
(Rep. Alan Casavant’s lead held and he won re-election by the 15 vote margin)

5:30 pm HD 54- Nadeau (D)/ incumbent Morrissette (R). Nadeau up 34.
(GOP Rep. Susan Morrissette of Winslow was upset by Democratic challenger Catherine Nadeau, whose lead after the recount was extended to a 52 vote victory)


Tuesday, November 20

Former State Senator and US Congressional District 1 GOP candidate Jon Courtney congratulates Senator Chris Johnson on his SD 20 re-election victory)

8:30 am SD 20 (Lincoln County)- incumbent Johnson (D)/ Fossel(R). Johnson up 164.
(Incumbent Senator Chris Johnson’s lead increased to a 171 margin)

(Sidenote: After his loss, former Rep. Les Fossel told Kennebec Journal reporter Sue Cover that he blamed his loss on ‘dirty politics’ and made this statement: “I’m going to figure out a way to punish people who do dirty campaigning.”

Interesting…)

HD 29’s Representative-Elect Stan Short (D-Pittsfield) is congratulated by GOP staff attorney Bill Logan, as MDP vice chair and AG candidate Janet Mills looks on)

5:30 pm HD 29- Short (D)/ Englehart (R). Short up 15.
(This open seat formerly held by GOP Rep. Stacey Fitts of Pittsfield went to Stanley Short of Pittsfield, who won by 11 votes)

So here now is the full list of the 126th Legislature that will be sworn in on December 5th:

    SENATE

    SD1- Dawn Hill (D)- Incumbent

    SD2- Ronald Collins (R)- Incumbent

    SD3- John Tuttle (D)

    SD4- David Dutremble (D)

    SD5- Linda Valentino (D)

    SD6- James Boyle (D)

    SD7- Rebecca Millett (D)

    SD8- Justin Alfond (D)- Incumbent; Senate President

    SD9- Anne Haskell (D)

    SD10- Stan Gerzofsky (D)- Incumbent

    SD11- Dick Woodbury (I)- Incumbent

    SD12- Gary Plummer (R)

    SD13- James Hamper (R)

    SD14- John Patrick (D)- Incumbent

    SD15- John Cleveland (D)

    SD16- Margaret Craven (D)- Incumbent

    SD17- Garrett Mason (R)- Incumbent

    SD18- Thomas Saviello (R)- Incumbent

    SD19- Seth Goodall (D)- Incumbent; Majority Leader

    SD20- Christopher Johnson (D)- Incumbent

    SD21- Patrick Flood (R)

    SD22- Edward Mazurek (D)

    SD23- Michael Thibodeau (R)- Incumbent; Minority Leader

    SD24- Roger Katz (R)- Incumbent; Assistant Minority Leader

    SD25- Colleen Lachowicz (D)

    SD26- Rodney Whittemore (R)- Incumbent

    SD27- Douglas Thomas (R)- Incumbent

    SD28- Brian Langley (R)- Incumbent

    SD29- David Burns (R)

    SD30- Emily Cain (D)

    SD31- Edward Youngblood (R)

    SD32- Geoffrey Gratwick (D)

    SD33- Andre Cushing (R)

    SD34- Roger Sherman (R)- Incumbent

    SD35- Troy Jackson (D)- Incumbent; Assistant Majority Leader

    HOUSE

    HD1- Allen Nadeau (R)

    HD2- Ken Theriault (D)- Incumbent

    HD3- Bernard Ayotte (R)- Incumbent

    HD4- Carol McElwee (R)

    HD5- Robert Saucier (D)

    HD6- Tyler Clark (R)- Incumbent

    HD7- Alex Willette (R)- Incumbent; Assistant Minority Leader

    HD8- Joyce Fitzpatrick (R)- Incumbent

    HD9- Ricky Long (R)- Incumbent

    HD10- Stephen Stanley (D)

    HD11- Beth Turner (R)- Incumbent

    HD12- Jeffery Gifford (R)- Incumbent

    HD13- Anita Haskell (R)

    HD14- James Dill (D)- Incumbent

    HD15- Adam Goode (D)- Incumbent

    HD16- John Schneck (D)

    HD17- Victoria Kornfield (D)

    HD18- Aaron Frey (D)

    HD19- Ryan Tipping-Spitz (D)

    HD20- David Johnson (R)- Incumbent

    HD21- Arthur Verow (D)

    HD22- Stacey Guerin (R)- Incumbent

    HD23- Roger Reed (R)

    HD24- Raymond Wallace (R)- Incumbent

    HD25- Ken Fredette (R)- Incumbent; Minority Leader

    HD26- Paul Davis Sr (R)- Incumbent

    HD27- Peter Johnson (R)- Incumbent

    HD28- Dean Cray (R)- Incumbent

    HD29- Stanley Short (D)

    HD30- Lawrence Lockman (R)- Incumbent

    HD31- Joyce Maker (R)- Incumbent

    HD32- Katherine Cassidy (D)

    HD33- Peter Doak (R)

    HD34- Richard Malaby (R)- Incumbent

    HD35- Brian Hubbell (D)

    HD36- Walter Kumiega (D)- Incumbent

    HD37- Ralph Chapman (D)- Incumbent

    HD38- Louis Luchini (D)- Incumbent

    HD39- Brian Duprey (D)

    HD40- Richard Campbell (R)

    HD41- James Gillway (R)- Incumbent

    HD42- Joseph Brooks (I)

    HD43- Erin Herbig (D)- Incumbent

    HD44- Jethro Pease (R)

    HD45- Brian Jones (D)

    HD46- Joan Welsh (D)- Incumbent

    HD47- Elizabeth Dickerson (D)

    HD48- Charles Kruger (D)- Incumbent

    HD49- Jeffrey Evangelos (I)

    HD50- Ellen Winchenbach (R)

    HD51- Mick Devin (D)

    HD52- Deborah Sanderson (R)- Incumbent

    HD53- Timothy Marks (D)

    HD54- Catherine Nadeau (D)

    HD55- David Cotta (R)- Incumbent

    HD56- Corey Wilson (R)

    HD57- Matthew Pouliot (R)

    HD58- Lori Fowle (D)

    HD59- Gay Grant (D)

    HD60- Andrew Mason (D)

    HD61- Bruce MacDonald (D)- Incumbent

    HD62- Jennifer DeChant (D)

    HD63- Charles Priest (D)- Incumbent

    HD64- Jeremy Saxton (D)

    HD65- Peter Kent (D)- Incumbent

    HD66- Matthea Daughtry (D)

    HD67- Seth Berry (D)- Incumbent; Majority Leader

    HD68- Michael Beaulieu (R)- Incumbent

    HD69- Brian D. Bolduc (D)- Incumbent

    HD70- Wayne Werts (D)

    HD71- Mike Lajoie (D)- Incumbent

    HD72- Michael Carey (D)- Incumbent

    HD73- Nathan Libby (D)

    HD74- Margaret Rotundo (D)- Incumbent

    HD75- Stephen Wood (R)- Incumbent

    HD76- Henry Beck (D)- Incumbent

    HD77- Thomas Longstaff (D)- Incumbent

    HD78- Robert Nutting (R)- Incumbent

    HD79- Sharon Treat (D)- Incumbent

    HD80- Melvin Newendyke (R)- Incumbent

    HD81- Gary Knight (R)- Incumbent

    HD82- Craig Hickman (D)

    HD83- Dennis Keschl (R)- Incumbent

    HD84- Karen Kusiak (D)

    HD85- Jeffrey McCabe (D)- Incumbent; Assistant Majority Leader

    HD86- Ann Dorney (D)

    HD87- Paul Gilbert (D)- Incumbent

    HD88- Larry Dunphy (R)- Incumbent

    HD89- Lance Harvell (R)- Incumbent

    HD90- Russell Black (R)- Incumbent

    HD91- Jarrod Crockett (R)- Incumbent

    HD92- Matthew J. Peterson (D)- Incumbent

    HD93- Sheryl Briggs (D)- Incumbent

    HD94- Terry Hayes (D) – Incumbent

    HD95- Tom Winsor (R)- Incumbent

    HD96- Jeffrey Timberlake (R)- Incumbent

    HD97- Helen Rankin (D)- Incumbent

    HD98- Lisa Villa (D)

    HD99- Jonathan Kinney (R)

    HD100- Roger Jackson (R)

    HD101- Christine Powers (D)

    HD102- Michael Shaw (D)- Incumbent

    HD103- Michael McClellan (R)- Incumbent

    HD104- Dale Crafts (R)- Incumbent

    HD105- Elsie Espling (R)- Incumbent

    HD106- Sara Gideon (D)

    HD107- Janice Cooper (D)

    HD108- Stephen Moriarty (D)

    HD109- Anne Graham (D)- Incumbent

    HD110- Thomas Tyler (R)

    HD111- Jane Pringle (D)

    HD112- Mary Nelson (D)- Incumbent

    HD113- Mark Dion (D- Incumbent)

    HD114- Peter Stuckey (D)- Incumbent

    HD115- Erik Jorgensen (D)

    HD116- Denise Harlow (D)- Incumbent

    HD117- Richard Farnsworth (D)

    HD118- Matthew Moonen (D)

    HD119- Benjamin Chipman (I)- Incumbent

    HD120- Diane Russell (D)- Incumbent

    HD121- Kimberly Monaghan-Derrig (D)- Incumbent

    HD122- Terry Morrison (D)- Incumbent

    HD123- Scott Hamann (D)

    HD124- Bryan Kaenrath (D)- Incumbent

    HD125- Ann Peoples (D)- Incumbent

    HD126- Andrew Gattine (D)

    HD127- Amy Volk (R)- Incumbent

    HD128- Heather Sirocki (R)- Incumbent

    HD129- Andrew McLean (D)

    HD130- Linda Sanborn (D)- Incumbent

    HD131- Donald Marean (R)

    HD132- Sharri MacDonald (R)

    HD133- Barry Hobbins (D)

    HD134- Justin Chenette (D)

    HD135- Paulette Beaudoin (D)- Incumbent

    HD136- Megan Rochelo (D)- Incumbent

    HD137- Alan Casavant (D)- Incumbent

    HD138- James Campbell (I)

    HD139- Aaron Libby (R)- Incumbent

    HD140- Wayne Parry (R)- Incumbent

    HD141- Paul Bennett (R)- Incumbent

    HD142- Andrea Boland (D) – Incumbent

    HD143- Anne-Marie Mastraccio (D)

    HD144- William Noon (D)

    HD145- Joshua Plante (D)

    HD146- Mark Eves (D)- Incumbent; Speaker of the House

    HD147- Kathleen Chase (R)- Incumbent

    HD148- Roberta Beavers (D)- Incumbent

    HD149- Paul McGowan (D)

    HD150- Windol Weaver (R)- Incumbent

    HD151- Deane Rykerson (D)

    Tribal Representatives

    Wayne Mitchell (Penobscot Nation)
    Madonna Soctomah (Passamaquoddy Tribe)

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