Maine Takes Up Right to Food, GMO Labeling in Public Hearing

Posted on May 7, 2015. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , |

craigA large rally (pictures here)between the State House and Cross Building was held April 30, as hundreds gathered in Augusta to show support or testify on a series of food rights and GMO labeling bills heard by the 127th Maine Legislature’s standing Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry (AG) Committee:

    LD 456, An Act To Include Nonalcoholic Malt Beverages in the List of Exempt Products in the Law Regarding the Labeling of Genetically Engineered Products
    Rep. Black of Wilton

    LD 783, RESOLUTION, Proposing an Amendment to the Constitution of Maine To Establish a Right to Food
    Rep. Hickman of Winthrop

    LD 991, An Act To Amend Maine’s Genetically Modified Food Products Labeling Law
    Rep. Dunphy of Old Town

    LD 1326, An Act To Require Labeling of All Genetically Modified Products
    Sen. Burns of Washington

Here is video of the large rally.

During the five plus hour long public hearing, testimony was offered by a variety of individuals and organizations on both sides of the discussions, as well as local individuals and national interested parties. Among those non-legislative members who spoke or whose testimony was presented (partial list):

Proponents:

    Joel Salatin, author, Virginia farmer, and leading voice for small, ecologically-minded farmers
    Jonathan Emord, a Washington D.C.-based attorney and expert on states’ rights to pass GMO labeling laws
    Michael Hansen, senior scientist with the Consumers Union
    Katherine Paul, associate director of the Organic Consumers Association
    Nisha Swinton, New England Director, Food and Water Watch
    Jerry Greenfield, Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream co-founder (read by GOP Rep. Matt Pouliot of Augusta)
    Heather Spalding, deputy director of MOFGA

    Nancy Oden
    Bonnie Preston
    Brian Jones
    Heather Retberg
    Hendrik D. Gideonse
    Richard King
    Maria King
    Betsy Garrold
    Joy Metcalf

Opponents:

    Shelly Doak, Maine Grocers and Food Producers Association
    Greg Dugal, Maine Restaurant Association
    Jon Olson, Maine Farm Bureau
    Ellis Additon, Bureau of Agriculture, Food and Rural Resources
    Bruce Krupke, NorthEast Dairy Foods (New York)

Here are videos of the entire public hearing. The work session for these bills is set for May 7.

. https://youtu.be/yh_hIsRHZ74

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LCRED Committee Takes Up 8 Minimum Wage Bills in Public Hearing

Posted on March 24, 2015. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

DSC_0010On Monday the 127th Maine Legislature’s Labor, Commerce, Research and Economic Development (LCRED) Committee heard testimony on eight bills relating to modifying the state’s minimum wage, which currently sits at $7.50 an hour and has not been increased since 2006. A bill to raise it was passed by the 126th Legislature last year, but was vetoed by Governor LePage and later sustained.

Link here to the bills:

  • LD 36 (sponsored by Rep. Jeff Evangelos)
  • LD 52 (sponsored by Rep. Danny Martin)
  • LD 72 (sponsored by Rep. Scott Hamann)
  • LD 77 (sponsored by Sen. Dave Miramant)
  • LD 92 (sponsored by Rep. Dillon Bates)
  • LD 487 (sponsored by Rep. Ben Chipman)
  • LD 843 (sponsored by Rep. Gina Melaragno)
  • LD 739 (sponsored by Sen. Tom Saviello)

Some of the statements released yesterday are below.

    Rep. Gina Melaragno (D-Auburn): “Maine workers find themselves working at least full time but still living in or near poverty, while having to care for their families at the same time. They have seen the prices of everything go up except the price of their undervalued labor, and they are tired of being thrown a small token raise every five or six years. They want meaningful, lasting change.”

    DSC_0014Sen. Dave Miramant (D-Camden): “When I looked back at the value of the minimum wage, it hit an all-time high just as I was starting to work in 1969. The minimum wage was $1.60 per hour but that gave me the equivalent of a $10.19 wage in 2015 dollars. This is why we were able to start a large middle class through this period. We have been falling behind ever since! Because we have failed to tie the minimum wage to the Consumer Price Index (CPI), or some reliable method of indexing it to inflation, workers are being left behind in this state and in many others. The jobs that were supposed to be entry level and only short term have become an ongoing reality for far too many workers in our hobbled economy.”

    Matt Schlobohm, Maine AFL-CIO Executive Director: “People who work full time should not live in poverty. People who work hard should be able to earn enough to make ends meet. It’s long overdue that Maine workers get a raise. A meaningful increase in the minimum wage would improve the wages of hundreds of thousands of Mainers. It would spur economic activity and pump millions of dollars into the Maine economy. Its good economics, its the right thing to do, and it’s long overdue. We need to raise wages across the board. All throughout Maine, working families are living paycheck to paycheck and struggling to make ends meet. Workers wages are simply not keeping pace with rising costs. Raising the minimum wage is a first step in a larger effort to build an economy that works for everyone, not just the wealthy few.”

    100_5797Ben Chin, political director for Maine Peoples Alliance: “I’m here today to testify primarily in support of LD 843, “An Act to Raise the Minimum Wage and Index it to the National Average Wage,” sponsored by Rep Melaragno. We (MPA) believe that LDs 36, 52, 72, 77, 92, 487, and 739 offer encouraging steps in the right direction. But LD 843 offers the most significant movement towards a living wage for all Maine workers. The reality is that need an even larger increase than what LD 843 offers. A living wage in Maine for a single adult, on average, is $15.82. Fifty-five percent of job openings in Maine pay less than that. For every job that pays $15.82, there are twelve job-seekers on average. The most basic premise of the American economic social contract is that you can work forty hours a week and make ends meet. Our minimum wage of $7.50 an hour for non-tipped workers doesn’t get an individual even halfway there—let alone their families.”

    Ginette Rivard, President of MSEA-SEIU Local 1989: “Five and a half years ago years ago, on Oct. 1, 2009, Maine added 25 cents to its minimum wage, bringing it to $7.50 an hour. It’s been stuck there ever since – even as the cost of living has gone up for all of us.

    Take a look at what is happening in the rest of New England and you’ll see the State of Maine – and thousands of Maine’s working families – have fallen far behind when it comes to the minimum wage.

    100_5793Vermont’s minimum wage is $9.15 – and rising to $10.50 in 2018.
    In Massachusetts, the wage is $9 – and rising to $11 in 2017.
    In Rhode Island, the wage is $9.
    And in Connecticut, the wage is $9.15 – and rising to $10.10 in 2017.

    Yet Maine has been stuck at $7.50. Maine would be dead last in New England but for New Hampshire joining in a dangerous race to the bottom by falling back to the federal minimum wage of $7.25. A Maine worker putting in 40 hours at minimum wage grosses $300 a week. That’s $15,600 a year, before taxes. That’s not nearly enough for one person to live on, let alone a family.”

Here in order are videos (ten in all) of the entire day in LCRED.

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